Bronchial mudra – for asthma and inner strength

Bronchial mudra

I love mudras, as anyone who comes to my yoga class will know! These, put simply, are the hand gestures used in yoga and meditation. They can be used to focus the mind while meditating (most people are familiar with chin mudra, most often seen in people meditating – index finger and thumb touching, other 3 fingers straight – see pic below.)

chin mudra

The mudras work on similar pressure points to those found in the feet in reflexology. They can stimulate physical parts of the body, but also stimulate emotional/mental states. You usually have a visualisation and affirmation linked to the mudra.

Last night in class we did the bronchial mudra.

Both hands as above, little finger at base of thumb, ring finger on first joint, middle finger pressing pad of thumb, index finger straight. Do this for 5 minutes 5 times a day. In an acute attack of asthma, use this for 4-6 minutes, then the asthma mudra (can be found on line too).

Interestingly my book says people with respiratory problems often suffer from loneliness and isolation – too much detachment from the outer world or find it difficult to set boundaries. They find themselves plagued by other people’s duties and problems. This leads to stress so these poeple are pressed for time and out of breath. A general physical weakness is caused by this shallow breathing. When strength is reduced, weakness occurs on the mental-emotional level as well as the physical level.

Do any yoga breathing exercise to strengthen the lungs.

Visualisation

Do this while holding the mudra:
Direct your awareness to your pelvic floor.
Inhaling, count to 7 and take your awareness from your pelvic floor slowly to the crown of the head (you may visualise the chakras as you do so, if you wish
Hold your breath for 5 seconds at the top of the inhalation.
Exhaling, take your awareness back down the body, counting from 7 to 1. Pause before breathing in again.
The pauses are very important after each inhalation/exhalation.

Affirmation

Every breath gives me strength. It strengthens my body, mind and soul.

 

Enjoy and let me know if it helps!

 

(Thanks to Girtrud Hirschi and her amazing book of mudras!)

 

Pema Chodron: Joy

The Wisdom of No Escape

At the end of this week’s class I read an excerpt from Pema Chodron’s lovely book. It is from Chapter 6 and is about Joy.

The Navajo teach their children that every morning when the sun comes up, it’s a brand-new sun. It’s born each morning, it lives for the duration of one day, and in the evening it passes on, never to return again. As soon as the children are old enough to understand, the adults take them out at dawn and they say, “The sun has only one day. You must live this day in a good way, so that the sun won’t have wasted precious time.” Acknowledging the preciousness of each day is a good way to live, a good way to reconnect with our basic joy.

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The whole chapter expands this theme and is well worth reading. She tells a story of a woman runnign away from tigers and she climbs down a cliff, and the tigers are above and below, waiting for her to fall. A mouse is nibbling away at the vine she is clinign on to. She also sees a bunch of strawberries near her. She takes a strawberry, eats it and enjoys it thoroughly. Pema Chodron says,

“Tigers above, tigers below. This is the predicament that we are always in, in terms of our birth and death. Each moment is just what it is. It might be the only moment of our life, the only strawberry we’ll ever eat. We could get depressed about it or we could finally appreciate it and delight in the preciousness of every single moment of our life.”

This is the message we read over and over in different forms: enjoy each moment as if it were your last. You never know what is in the future. It is hard to put this into action. Yoga and meditation help, but modern life is always driving us forwards, to achieve more and more, and not just smell the roses. So today, think about what your strawberry moment is and savour it!

The Law of Karma – in brief!

Deepak Chopra, The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success

Hi there

I promised my yoga students this week that I would write up the short reading I did from Deepak Chopra’s book at the end of class, so they can refer to it.

3. The Law of Karma, or Cause and Effect

Every action generates a force of energy
that returns to us in like kind…
what we sow is what we reap
And when we choose actions that bring
happiness and success to others
the fruit of our karma is happiness and success

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p.49 I will put the Law of Karma into effect by making a commitment to take the following steps:

1. Today I will witness the choices I make in each moment. And in the mere witnessing of these choices, I will bring them to my conscious awareness. I will know that the best way to prepare for any moment in the future is to be fully conscious in the present.

2. Whenever I make a choice, I will ask myself two questions: What are the consequences of this choice that I’m making? and Will this choice bring fulfillment and happiness to me and also to those who are affected by this choice?

3. I will then ask my heart for guidance and be guided by its message of comfort or discomfort. If the choice feels comfortable, I will plunge ahead iwth abandon. If the choice feels uncomfortable, I will pause and see the consequences of my action with my inner vision. This guidance will enable me to make spontaneously correct choices for myself and for all those around me.

This is obviously easier said than done, but a good reminder nevertheless. Being 100% present in our decision making is very difficult, but if we can do this for even, say, 10% of the time, then we will see the benefits and it will encourage us to start a new habit. Remembering that how we feel is always a result of decisions that we have made and not because of what other people have done is hard. But we have a choice, if someone says or does something we don’t like, we can choose to respond in kind, and then maybe feel bad about it later and not even realise why we feel angry or resentful. Or we can choose to think: that is their stuff, it’s not about me, and feel compassionate and respond in a caring way. Then we have nothing to feel bad about.

 

Equanimity

Seeking the heart of wisdom

This is the book by Joseph Goldstein and Jack Kornfield about insight meditation that I’ve only really dipped into, but I was re-reading a chapter about equanimity which seems quite apt at the moment for me. JK describes equanimity as a mountain that remains unwavering despite snow, lightning, rain. He says equanimity is being able to remain centered and unmoved no matter what happens.

“Equanimity is developed as we learn to keep our heart open through the changing circumstances of our life… A profound equanimity arises as we release our identification with this body-mind process.” Rather than greeting challenging experiences with fear or anxiety we accept that these are only temporary states. He says shamans call it Shamanic Equilibrium, which allows the shaman to travel to even the extreme realms of pain and death without fear of difficulty.

This echoes a quote that I have as my wallpaper on my laptop:

“Faith includes noticing the mess, the emptiness, the discomfort and letting it be there until some light returns.” Anne Lamott.

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This has helped me through many difficult times this year. At the moment, I feel as if I’ve gone backwards: the back problems that have prevented me from doing so much the last 2 years and kept me housebound, seem to be finally dissipating, but at the same time the problems with my jaw and skull that make me feel like a zombie and unable to concentrate have got worse. I’ve been feeling exhausted and stressed and this week my head felt like it was going to explode. The vicious circle is that I know that to ease the pressure I need to see an osteopath, but every time I’ve seen an osteopath in the last 2 years I’ve ended up housebound.. In the meantime, I have to accept that this state is only temporary: One day I will be able to read and see clearly, I will be able to ride my bike and go abroad, but for now, I have to rest and accept that this is part of the journey to finding a new way of living, a new me. I often think of someone once saying to me that it is unrealistic of me to think the path of healing will be an easy one, anything worth having has to be worked for. That comforts me when I’m struggling.

p 76 “Equanimity is a quality of mind and heart…that allows one to meet every experience with both strength and a softness or fluidity that doesn’t get caught by circumstances. To discover its great power within is one of the great joys of practice.” J Kornfield

I can elect to change all thoughts that hurt

Love is Letting Go of Fear

This  is a great little book that has been sitting on my book shelf unread for years. It’s by Gerald G Jampolsky MD. (Great name!)

It’s another of the many books that seem to have flourished in the 1980s around the theme of healing and being happy. Others of this era, who I’ve previously mentioned, include Bernie Siegel, Louise Hay and Elizabeth Kubler Ross. This book apparently follows the themes of the Course in Miracles but massively simplified (fortunately, as it is a huge bible of a book that I’ve only managed to read 2 pages of so far!) For anyone with a short attention span, it has very short chapters and lots of cartoons! Bite sized chunks of wisdom.

Buddha in my garden!

Buddha in my garden!

I wanted to share one of the chapters I’ve just read:

I can elect to change all thoughts that hurt

“That free will and choice are inherent attributes of the mind is something that most of us tend to forget. We have all had the experience of feeling trapped in a situation where there seemed to be no escape.

Here is a suggestion that may prove helpful under such circumstances. You can use active imagination to find a way out. Picture a wall and let it represent your problem. On this wall paint a door and hang a red exit sign above it. Imagine yourself opening the door, walking through it and shutting it firmly behind you. Your problem is no longer with you since you have left it behind. Experience your new found freedom by imagining yourself in a place where you have no worries and there is nothing to do other than what you would enjoy. When you are ready to leave your happy retreat, bring with you this newly found sense of  release from past problem-solving attempts. In the freshness of your new perception, solutions previously unavailable to you will now occur.”

Meditation on Kindness

Kindness

Following on from the end of my last post where I reminded about attempting to be kind in thought, word and deed all week, I thought I’d post a meditation on kindness today. It’s really simple and can be adapted to whatever quality you want to encourage into your life now.

The Meditation

Sit comfortably, cross legged, kneeling or on a chair, as long as you are comfortable. Place your left hand on your heart and your right hand just below your belly button. Women can place their hand on their womb. Take some deep breaths, focusing your breath into your heart and womb/abdomen/hara. This brings the focus into the body and down from the mind. You may find that you become aware of how you feel emotionally. Sit with any emotions that come up – don’t suppress them, allow them to be there. You may find you want to cry – that’s fine, acknowledge the emotion and let it go. Don’t suppress it. You may also feel a warm sense of love. Whatever it is, embrace it don’t suppress it.

Visualisation of kindness

When you are ready, start to visualise kindness flowing into your heart. (If you wish, you can visualise it flowing from God, Mother Earth, The Universal Energy, whatever works for you.) Or just focus on kindness itself. You can imagine it any way you wish, or just imagine a sense of warmth. Stay with any emotions that arise. If your thoughts wander, gently bring your awareness back to the sense of kindness. Continue for as long as you feel comfortable.

This may be enough for you. If you are doing this meditation for the first time maybe leave it here. However, you could also have a sense of sending the kindness out from you. Imagine it flowing out into the world/universe every time you exhale. Or you may wish to send it out to particular people – friends, relatives, anyone you think might benefit from it. If you are ready, you could also send kindness to people that you are having difficulties with. (This is very much like the Buddhist Metta Bhavana meditation). But this might be difficult if you are new to meditating and it might be kinder to yourself (!) to just bring kindness to your own heart for now. As we all know, you can’t love anyone else until you really love yourself. In the same way you can’t really genuinely send kindness out without being able to be kind to yourself first.

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My own practice

Personally, I incorporate this into my daily meditation. I have a timer app on my phone which divides 20 minutes into 5 minute segments. One of these segments is always this meditation.

The first post…

It’s quite daunting starting a new blog. But one of the main reasons I’ve started it is that I’ve been like a big sponge the last 2 months reading books about healing and changing your life. Partly I want to record what I’m learning so I don’t forget things, but also to have it on record for other people to access. This has been a big journey of knowledge for me and I’ve been lucky that I’ve had the time to immerse myself in it. Each book has referenced other books, which I’ve then read, and as I’ve done so my understanding has deepened. I’ve also discovered an interest in such things as quantum healing and epigenetics that I would never have imagined myself being fascinated by before. But if all of the references help someone else to find new ways of looking at life, as I have, then I will feel that this blog has achieved what I set out to do. At the very least I can give you pointers for where to find the information for yourself.

Sometimes we just need one inspiration to set us on our way. For me, that was Louise Hay’s You Can Heal Your Life. I’d had it on my bookshelf for years and never read it and eventually took it to a charity shop a year or so ago. Then someone recommended it to me before Christmas. I ordered it from Amazon and before it arrived I discovered a talk by Louise Hay on YouTube of her basic principles of life and positive thinking. Her philosophy and affirmations pretty much saved me from going mad over Christmas when I was housebound for the second time in a year with a back problem. I have probably read the book 3 times now, in bits and pieces. A lot of people think her philosophy is a little bit simplistic or overly head-based when you want to be living more from your heart, but I can only thank her for being there when I needed some hope. The affirmations helped me remain positive when last year I was in the depths of despair. And along the way she referenced other compassionate writers such as Dr Bernie Siegel, who have inspired her, more of whom anon…

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